Pet cemetery Tokyo

People with pets dispose of their deceased animals’ remains in different ways, but if they live in the city the options are obviously more limited. Kannōji in Setagaya, Tokyo, accepts local strays and cats from animal shelters, earning it the affectionate moniker of cat temple.” Head priest Narita Junkyō started to provide memorial funeral prayer services for animals on a regular basis around 13 years ago.
Aeon Retail Co, which has an online site Aeon’s Pet Funeral” that introduces pet cemeteries, says about 50% of its customers request joint cremations, followed by individual cremations not attended by owners (30% ). The other 20% attend individual funerals.



In a 2004 survey by a pet food company Japanese households gave the following reasons for keeping cats (percentage) : 1) cats are adorable (71.1 percent); 2) they like cats (70.3 percent); 3) cats are fun to be around (58.4 percent); 4) cats enrich daily lives (50.4 percent); 5) adopted a stray cat (36.1 percent; 6) cats are indispensable for family communication (35.7 percent).
According to the Japanese Civil Code, pets are deemed objects and assets can not be left to them so wills are worked out so that money is given to non-family members on the condition they take care of the pets and defines the terms in which the pets are taken care of. Dogs that are put to sleep are given their favorite food, told God boy, you’ve done your best,” and then given a lethal injection.

They placed incense sticks in front of the incinerator, and watched the dog’s body being cremated. Both women call their pets daughter” (the cat) and son” (the dog). The basic funeral service fee starts from 95,800 yen ($860.66) for a one-kilogram hamster or bird and can go up to 114,800 yen for a 20-kilogram dog, according to funeral services company Kokolone.
The latter category is further divided into two types-ones in which the entire process is left to the service operator and the other in which the pet owners pick up the pet bones from the ashes. As it could take as long as two hours for the remains to incinerate, Pet 594 Car will deliver the ashes back to your home when the process is finished.
Japanese people are generally very much against putting their pets to sleep. Pets today are regarded by many as full-fledged members of the family, enjoying an equal—and in certain cases higher—status as human members of a household. Displaying your special family member’s remains is a beautiful way to memorialize them for a lifetime.

Research by Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology indicated the average age of dogs rose from 8.6 years in the early 1990s to 11.9 in the early 2000s and the average age of cats rose from 5.1 year to 11.9 years in the same period. If owners who allow their pet inside for part of the time were also included, then the figures grew to 89.1% for dogs and 96.9% for cats.
Recognizing the issue, South Korea’s Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs plans to conduct a series of inspections and crackdowns on unauthorized animal cremation ペット 火葬 services in association with local governments. If you are planning to understand the Cremation Furnace market in and out, then this is a must have report.

When pets die, their remains have to be treated correctly and hygienically. There are several pet taxi services operating in certain areas around Tokyo that accept all kinds of dogs, small or large. Most commonly observed are the Buddhist service on the seventh day after death, shonanoka (初七日), and the 49th day, shijūkunichi (四十九日).
The revised Law of Humane Treatment and Management of Animals that has come into force in Japan stipulates that owners should look after their pets until they die. Growing numbers of pet owners are demanding full-fledged funerals for their late beloved animal companions, leading to heated debate among Buddhist scholars about what happens to pets after they die.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website at WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: